Inside Warez Part 1

Subj:      Fwd: º^º^( InSide WaReZ Issue #2 (Part 1)^º^º

Date:      97-07-27 15:21:53 EDT

From:     SPYER2000

To:          BeAwareX1

 

 

—————–

Forwarded Message:

Subj:      º^º^( InSide WaReZ Issue #2 (Part 1)^º^º

Date:      97-07-27 14:35:28 EDT

From:     BuBBLe HoP

 

«–¥(TRauMaTiZeD MassMailer²·º ßy: ßaNiCKuLa)¥–»

«–¥(This one is Dedicated to TaSHa, BaNiCKuLa’s True Love!)¥–»

«–¥(This Mail took 33.61719 Seconds to send)¥–»

«–¥(There are 69 out of 73 people on the MM)¥–»

«–¥(There have been: 0 Un-Retrievable Mails on This MM)¥–»

«–¥(This is Mail Number: 6 of  19 Mails)¥–»

 

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AOL WaReZ RoOmZ

[[[[{{{{(((( WaReZ RoOmZ ))))}}}}]]]]

 

(((((¥«§»Keepin da WaReZ phree«§»¥)))))

 

  1. FREESHIT ( thats an L not an I ) This room will open July 31 at 4:00 East Coast
  2. IVIXIVI ( look like MXM???)
  3. UPSS
  4. MM
  5. Zeraw
  6. VvaReZ
  7. Moose
  8. Games
  9. Server
  10. Phish
  11. POA
  12. HoAOL
  13. TCT
  14. Glass
  15. Sleep
  16. AVI
  17. Fate
  18. Freestuff
  19. Fuck
  20. proggie
  21. trade
  22. Passwords
  23. Havok
  24. AOLsuX
  25. war
  26. phuck
  27. AOHell
  28. Kill
  29. AOLhelp
  30. hell
  31. fire
  32. flood
  33. chaos
  34. owa
  35. anarchy
  36. carkill
  37. catfree
  38. doom
  39. final
  40. freeprogs
  41. hotice
  42. MP3 <——–trades MuZiC
  43. AuDiO <——–trades MuZiC
  44. mxm <——–closed
  45. Mass Mail <——–closed
  46. WaReZ <——–closed
  47. Freeshit <——–closed
  48. coldice <——–closed
  49. Tequillabug <——–isn’t used anymore
  50. hotice <——–isn’t used anymore

Early Phishing

Koceilah Rekouche [email protected]

The history of phishing traces back in important ways to the mid-1990s when hacking
software facilitated the mass targeting of people in password stealing scams on America
Online (AOL). The first of these software programs was mine, called AOHell, and it was
where the word phishing was coined. The software provided an automated password
and credit card-stealing mechanism starting in January 1995. Though the practice of
tricking users in order to steal passwords or information possibly goes back to the
earliest days of computer networking, AOHell’s phishing system was the first automated
tool made publicly available for this purpose. 1 The program influenced the creation of
many other automated phishing systems that were made over a number of years. These
tools were available to amateurs who used them to engage in a countless number of
phishing attacks. By the later part of the decade, the activity moved from AOL to other
networks and eventually grew to involve professional criminals on the internet. What
began as a scheme by rebellious teenagers to steal passwords evolved into one of the
top computer security threats affecting people, corporations, and governments.

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Exploring Historical & Emerging Phishing Techniques

International Journal of Network Security & Its Applications (IJNSA), Vol.5, No.4, July 2013
DOI : 10.5121/ijnsa.2013.5402 23

Marc A. Rader1 and Syed (Shawon) M. Rahman2, *
1CapellaUniversity, Minneapolis, MN, USA and Associate Faculty, Cochise CollegeAZ, USA
[email protected]
Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Hawaii-Hilo, Hawaii,
USA and Part-time Faculty at Capella University, Minneapolis, USA
*[email protected]
ABSTRACT
Organizations invest heavily in technical controls for their Information Assurance (IA) infrastructure.
These technical controls mitigate and reduce the risk of damage caused by outsider attacks. Most
organizations rely on training to mitigate and reduce risk of non-technical attacks such as social
engineering. Organizations lump IA training into small modules that personnel typically rush through
because the training programs lack enough depth and creativity to keep a trainee engaged. The key to
retaining knowledge is making the information memorable. This paper describes common and emerging
attack vectors and how to lower and mitigate the associated risks.
KEY WORDS
Security Risks, Phishing, Social Engineering, Cross Site Scripting, Emerging Attack Vectors, DNS poising.
1. INTRODUCTION
Phishing is a social engineering technique that is used to bypass technical controls implemented
to mitigate security risks in information systems. People are the weakest link in any security
program. Phishing capitalizes on this weakness and exploits human nature in order to gain access
to a system or to defraud a person of their assets.

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AOL Sites

Here’s a huge list of AOL Sites from the past, I found a lot these from visiting other affiliates through several sites on archive.org

 

I’ve also pulled a ton of content that was still available on the archive.org website by viewing a lot of these sites.

 

http://observers.net

http://screen.name

http://www.outkastz.com

http://xeons.net

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Encyclopediadramatica.es/AOL

AOL

Stands for “American Offline,” and is sometimes referred to as “AOHell“, “gAyOL”,”LOL”, or “my shitty internets.” It’s one of the last surviving online services from the pre-home internet days, and originally offered an entire online system with limited internet accessa virus that was invented at least 100 years ago, and was wide-spread, being a serious rival for MSN. Today it offers banal, mainstream content for an exorbitant fee and few useful features. It creates a warm, fuzzy, safe-feeling environment for those who fear being on the Internets alone.180px-Aol_dog

An irony about AOL is its creation and ownership of the AOL Instant Messenger system which is heavily used by many people who have a vehement hatred for AOL the ISP, but don’t hesitate to use the AOL IM feature as it is so ubiquitous amongst internet users that there is almost no escaping it. In other words, you hate AIM but have to use it because all of your friends are too stupid to use anything better. Also, AIM is guaranteed to make your computer 100% slower.

When AOL is referred to as an ISP, this is somewhat incorrect, AOL is actually considered a “content provider” as opposed to an Internet access provider. This is due to the fact that you must read at least a nominal part of AOL content before being given access to the raw Internet. But no one gives a shit.

AOL will never stop billing your credit card. Never.

AOL was once the world’s only source of 3.5″ floppy disks. When they went to CD for distribution, they went out of business.

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Digital5k.com

aol progz… a digital throw back to AOL, 1995.

one of the main reasons that i decided to recreate my digital5k.com website was the constant memories of the AOL progz days.  i won’t lie, there are redundant reminders of my AOL/visual basic (vb)/C++ childhood.  it was a great time in life and the internet, if you ask me.  let’s start off by how it all caught my attention and obsession… ascii art – which doomed my future and solidified my career in computers, programming, development and marketing.

2014-10-25 10_14_23-aol progz… a digital throw back to AOL, 1995.

yep, ascii art was the one little element that attack my attention span and made me say ‘whoa, that’s pretty cool’.  better known in those days as scrollers or macros.  a macro is simple font characters put together to form a type of pre-digital art.  i’ll never forget the first time i signed into AOL and say that beautiful scroll ascii art by ao-hell.

AOHellSplashScreen (1)

i was in 6th grade.  who knows how old i was, i don’t feel like doing the math.  i had just moved to the hell hole known as _____ from Houston, Texas.  i had no friends.  i knew nobody.  i just wanted to go home.  since Texas schools let out a few weeks earlier, i had some time to kill.  a very dangerous thing for a teenager.  what is a borderline anti social teen to do in a city with no friends?  go on the internet with the elite speed of 56 bits per second.

for those of us who remember, AOL was very… fucked.  the horrible chatrooms, stupid interface, laggy system and overall confusing nature, yet – it’s all we had.  the internet was a different place back in 1995.  images of a woman’s breasts were downloaded one pixel line at a time.  often stopping right above the nipple or right below the belly button.  there were no scams, very little spam, limited advertising and an innocence that can never be restored.  the internet was the preacher’s virgin daughter that was just getting ready to leave home, go off to college and get fucked, hard.

it took 3-4 attempts to connect to AOL back then, i would go on to later know the swift backdoor, alternate numbers and general brute force attacks that would prioritize my place in dial up line.  once you gained a stable connection, it was a release of endorphins that no drug has been able to reignite in my brain.  it was instant freedom.  no reality, no physical or gravitational limits, nobody to answer to.  it was an open digital playground with visual basic as monkey bars and the rush of adrenaline for swings.  it was a beautiful feeling for a child at the age of 12 with no real world experience.

finally,  you’re logged into AOL and you’re at the horrible start screen.  let’s go to a chatroom and see what’s popping.  ASL?  remember that?  jesus christ, why do i?  i must have been in a basketball related chatroom when i saw the very thing that would literally go on to change my life.  for the best.  a fucking scrolling advertisement for an aol prog known as ao-hell in an ascii format.

when i saw the 2 line scroll in a basketball chatroom i was first intrigued and then a bit shocked.  my initial thought was, what the hell is this?  i had no idea what it was, but i knew i needed it.  i needed to own it.  i needed to download it.  i needed to run this application.  just by the name, i knew it was something i would appreciate.
aol25_940x700-300x211

i started to IM the person who had ran this ao-hell prog.  the username?  that, too i will never forget – da chronic.

after 10-20 ignored IM’s i finally got an email.  a bit confused, i checked out the email.  it was blank.  cocksucker.  but wait, there’s an attachment?  aohell32.exe?  this must be the prog i’ve seen advertised.  without caution, i download and run it… and with that, my career choice is altered in a very dramatic way.

wait, a tool that i can use to flood emails? scroll and flood chatrooms?  boot people offline and cause all kinds of general hell and annoyances?  this is what i want.  this is what i need – this is what i want to make.  however, before i even thought about how/what it took to make one, i needed to study them all.  i cannot honestly tell you how many hours i spent in my bedroom over the next 2 years downloading, running, studying and then networking with the AOL progs and their programmers.  a few huge ones stick out for some reason for me;gothic nightmares, fate zero, millennium, pepsi, havok, ao-hell and the prophecy trilogy by unab0mber. (more…)

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AOL Warez – The History of AOL Warez – AOL Hacking

Before I begin, let me state the following: This is my personal perspective of the history of Warez and the scene in general on America Online (AOL). How the scene developed in the beginnings, and where it has evolved to today. I also would like to thank Mat Stars, Reflux, and Da Chronic himself for their input and insight. Enjoy.

Well, as of writing this, I am 22 years old (it’s 2003 as of this writing). I chose to write this little piece on the history of AOL Warez (at least from my perspective) for two primary reasons. Firstly, it may sound ‘lame’ or whatever, but I’ve been involved in the scene in one form or another since I was 10 years old… so that’s 12 years and counting. For better or for worse, AOL Warez has played a part in my life, and it’s something I don’t wish to ignore or forget as I get older, so this is a good reminder document for me. Secondly, being the “wise sage” that I am, I feel it may be of benefit or interest to others to share my experiences and knowledge about the history of the scene.

To be fully honest, I don’t know or recall exactly how *I* first got involved. I know it was when I had a 2400 baud modem, and was trading old software (DOS, 16 color games, etc) through single line BBS’s, around 1991 I believe. I first began using AOL 2.0 back in 1993, when the first version of AOL for Microsoft Windows was released. Yes, I had tried AOL for DOS (back then, there was no version number) in 1991, but at that point, AOL was called Quantum Computer Services. And in case anyone is wondering why AOL has always “been so easy to use,” it’s because it was originally designed for the Macintosh and Apple II. Anyhow, at this point there were fewer than 1 million subscribers, chat service did not exist, and the scene had not yet been born. Obviously, this is also pre-unlimited use per month days (which did not occur until 1996).

With the advent of 9600 baud modems, public chat rooms, and soon the private rooms which began spawning on the AOL service. Back then, the internet was not for everyone. Only tech savvy people who knew what was going on ever logged on to the internet during this time period, and by tech savvy, I’m referring to people such as myself: young, adolescent boys, with a curiosity of technology and sense of adventure. (Yes, I consider myself the Tom Sawyer of the modern age). Anyways, enough background information, on to the creation of the scene…

Primarily through word of mouth, news spread about free programs being offered in chat rooms for trade and download. Prior to this, I had been doing BBS trading on boards such as Iniquity and Eternity. On AOL, this was first done in public chat rooms; soon of course, people migrated to private rooms, and the creation of the “warez” series of rooms. For teenage boys who wanted free software, and to be part of the “in” club, things were going great. But something was missing. Along came a man, calling himself “Da Chronic.” Now, if you don’t know of this nick name, stop reading beyond here, you don’t belong. Da Chronic, who at the time was a 17 year old high school student from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, created the first of what was to become literally thousands of programs for use on AOL, none other than “AOHell.” A fairly simple program created in Visual Basic, AOHell reached a level of popularity which has never been equaled or even rivaled (no, don’t tell me FateX was more popular, it was not). AOHell allowed people to do several basic things. Firstly, it allowed anyone, his sister, mother and dog, to create fake accounts on AOL using randomly generated information. Secondly, it had a few built in macro’s, the most popular of which was the “scrolling middle finger.” Third, you could “email bomb” or “IM bomb” people, and just be generally disruptive, which was the true intent of Da Chronic. The original version of AOHell was released around November 1994.

So at this time, AOL didn’t really do a whole lot to stop the spread of Warez on their system. I’m sure they regret this now. Had they been aggressive in the early stages of the development of the scene, I am positive that it would not have survived, just as it did not on other similar services, such as Compuserve and Prodigy. All AOL did was modify the account sign up process. Essentially, they changed the checking account creation to have some sort of validation period, and basically that was about it for a while. Of course, that didn’t stop us. Some brilliant person figured out the now infamous ‘5396’ MasterCard prefix. Simply by having the correct 4 digit CC prefix, you could still create fake accounts fairly quickly, and AOHell and similar programs automated the process for you.

The “scene” as an organized community did not establish itself until the middle of 1995, probably during the summer months. Prior to this time, such a thing as “free warez” did not exist. You traded for programs/games/utilities etc. Then along game the first known organized group, dedicated to the “free warez” concept, SHiZZa. Basically, group members from SHiZZa went around warez rooms (now being called such things as ‘cold’ or ‘thin’ ice, since the word “warez” had been banned), and recruited new members. This was taken a step further by FWA (the Free Warez Alliance, which claimed to have created the ‘freewarez’ series of private rooms, once the ‘ice’ series was also banned). Other people quickly followed suit, and created groups of their own, most notably, UPS, MySTiC, and SNT which were formed within weeks or months of SHiZZa. Groups worthy of mention who came about in the second and third waves, include Synapse and iMaGe (which iMaGe was formed via merger of Gen-X and Digital) who then later on merged to form what is now Legion, DGG (which spawned off Arise), WaY (which died off), Logic (which moved to I-Net only), and OsW (died off). I’m sure there were other groups during this time, but these are the most important and prominent ones (and the ones which I can still remember). The three dominant groups during this time were UPS, MySTiC and WaY (the latter of which, I was a part of for a few short weeks). UPSS by the way, (the AOL arm of UPS), was the first group to begin “massmailing” Warez with automated programs, and WaY took it a step further when CooLziE created IcE DroP MM’er, the first stable, fast, and fully automated MM program (it could both collect screen names from a chat room where people signed up, and then MM them all on its own).
It was also during this time when “phishing” for accounts was ever so popular. Stupid new AOL’ers just seemed to love sharing their accounts with people. At that time, it was almost too easy to steal passwords since no one made unique, hard to guess pw’s. I remember trying out passwords like sex123 and getting into accounts with ease. Of course, the other major thing which was going on was “carding.” Once you stole a person’s CC information (or more often, they ‘volunteered’ it, you could go to places such as buy.com and FedEx shit using that stolen CC info, and within a few days have a new computer, or stereo or whatever your heart desired. Now, this is a simplified explanation of how ‘phishing’ and ‘carding’ both worked, but I am not going to get into the details of those two scenes; I merely wanted to mention them because they were loosely associated with the Warez scene.

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