AOHell v3.0 Rage Against The Machine by Da Chronic

For the last year, America Online has fought a freely-distributed program called AOHell, which allows would-be hackers unlimited free access to the system–in part, by exploiting AOL’s free trial disks.

The program provides powerful add-ons to AOL software, but also exploits bugs in AOL’s system to allow high-tech harrassing of users in chat rooms and via e-mail. In the documentation for AOHell, its creator explains why he wrote the program and its connection to AOL’s hypocritical stance on child pornography.

*******AOHell v3.0 Rage Against The Machine*******
By:
Da Chronic
Part I ——————- What is AOHell?
Part II ——————- The features in AOHell v3.0
Part III ——————- Is it safe to use AOHell?
Part IV ——————- Why I made AOHell

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Philly2600.net

2014-10-23 23_09_03-Philadelphia 2600_More Information

The Philadelphia 2600 was set up to gather people with a common intrest to represent a stereotyped culture, share knowledge, and have a good time. Everybody at the meetings has something to teach, no matter how new to computers, and everybody has something to learn, no matter how experienced. We ask everyone to keep an open mind at the meetings because even within our group there is diversity. The Philadelphia 2600 was set up for anybody with any electronic and computer intrest, not just “Hackers”. If you’re a graphic artist, come on down. If you’re a cable repair guy, come on down. If you’re a 10 year old midget with a 2X4 for a leg, come on down. If you’re a police officer or government official, you’re welcome too. As for everyone else, you’ll always find someone who’s willing to teach new members and this is the perfect place to do it.

This site was one of Russell Handorf’s old websites from 2001.  He went by satanklawz.

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Adrian Lamo and FBI Cyber Squad computer scientist Russell Handorf

10/18/12 Update: 2006 posting at forum – where Russell Handorf still contributes using his “grey hat hacker” handle “satanklawz” – suggests he has been working for FBI three years earlier than his resume claims; Adrian Lamo admits being “friends” with Handorf but still won’t answer any real questions; Chet Uber offers to have Lamo “interview” me – Neal Rauhauser, who claims he has nothing to do with Project Vigilant, suggests I should accept offer – which I will, after they start giving serious answers to my serious questions first; Project Vigilant submitted bid for Voice Stress Analyzer request by BoP to detect if inmates are lying.

Highlights: At college, Russell Handorf used to illegally “sniff” networks for free web access; Decade ago, hosted Adrian Lamo website where he used to be known as “satanklawz”; Defended Lamo online in web forum postings; In 2003, wrote that fugitive Lamo’s enemies might DoS the NY Times, attack investigators; Provided details on web on how to access potential Comcast customers’ private info; Wrote “Fear Not: Hacks, Attacks and Cracks” column; After Philadelphia InfraGard Board of Directors gig, former “grey hat hacker” joined FBI in September of 2009.

[Editor’s Note: Before publishing this article I emailed both Russell Handorf and Adrian Lamo to ask them questions about their past and possibly present relationship, but neither one got back to me. I’ll gladly correct any errors or add comments if they change their minds. My last two articles provide more background on Adrian Lamo, Neal Rauhauser, Project Vigilant and the Bradley Manning case: Bradley Manning Facebook friend was a security and risk management expert and More members from secretive, oddball Project Vigilant group revealed. Article by Ron Brynaert]

The following screenshot was the front page for a website owned by a “Grey Hat hacker” who the FBI hired to be a computer scientist for its Philadelphia Cyber Squad in 2009:

shtcmarchive

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ePIMP Email Accounts

Last modified on 9/22/2001

jaggededge@epimp.com
sux@epimp.com
Mugger@epimp.com
Terminate@epimp.com
WhiteOut@epimp.com
kryptonite@epimp.com
blob@epimp.com
joints@epimp.com

desktop@epimp.com
compuserve@epimp.com
busted@epimp.com
disney@epimp.com
finger@epimp.com
juggalos@epimp.com
slice@epimp.com
xeek@epimp.com
tet@epimp.com
tets@epimp.com
psmalls@epimp.com
faygo@epimp.com
glypha@epimp.com
pot@epimp.com
mza@epimp.com
k2@epimp.com
t0x@epimp.com
rikky@epimp.com
dbz@epimp.com
a1m@epimp.com
j4y@epimp.com
m0de@epimp.com
mode@epimp.com

AOL Warez – The History of AOL Warez – AOL Hacking

Before I begin, let me state the following: This is my personal perspective of the history of Warez and the scene in general on America Online (AOL). How the scene developed in the beginnings, and where it has evolved to today. I also would like to thank Mat Stars, Reflux, and Da Chronic himself for their input and insight. Enjoy.

Well, as of writing this, I am 22 years old (it’s 2003 as of this writing). I chose to write this little piece on the history of AOL Warez (at least from my perspective) for two primary reasons. Firstly, it may sound ‘lame’ or whatever, but I’ve been involved in the scene in one form or another since I was 10 years old… so that’s 12 years and counting. For better or for worse, AOL Warez has played a part in my life, and it’s something I don’t wish to ignore or forget as I get older, so this is a good reminder document for me. Secondly, being the “wise sage” that I am, I feel it may be of benefit or interest to others to share my experiences and knowledge about the history of the scene.

To be fully honest, I don’t know or recall exactly how *I* first got involved. I know it was when I had a 2400 baud modem, and was trading old software (DOS, 16 color games, etc) through single line BBS’s, around 1991 I believe. I first began using AOL 2.0 back in 1993, when the first version of AOL for Microsoft Windows was released. Yes, I had tried AOL for DOS (back then, there was no version number) in 1991, but at that point, AOL was called Quantum Computer Services. And in case anyone is wondering why AOL has always “been so easy to use,” it’s because it was originally designed for the Macintosh and Apple II. Anyhow, at this point there were fewer than 1 million subscribers, chat service did not exist, and the scene had not yet been born. Obviously, this is also pre-unlimited use per month days (which did not occur until 1996).

With the advent of 9600 baud modems, public chat rooms, and soon the private rooms which began spawning on the AOL service. Back then, the internet was not for everyone. Only tech savvy people who knew what was going on ever logged on to the internet during this time period, and by tech savvy, I’m referring to people such as myself: young, adolescent boys, with a curiosity of technology and sense of adventure. (Yes, I consider myself the Tom Sawyer of the modern age). Anyways, enough background information, on to the creation of the scene…

Primarily through word of mouth, news spread about free programs being offered in chat rooms for trade and download. Prior to this, I had been doing BBS trading on boards such as Iniquity and Eternity. On AOL, this was first done in public chat rooms; soon of course, people migrated to private rooms, and the creation of the “warez” series of rooms. For teenage boys who wanted free software, and to be part of the “in” club, things were going great. But something was missing. Along came a man, calling himself “Da Chronic.” Now, if you don’t know of this nick name, stop reading beyond here, you don’t belong. Da Chronic, who at the time was a 17 year old high school student from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, created the first of what was to become literally thousands of programs for use on AOL, none other than “AOHell.” A fairly simple program created in Visual Basic, AOHell reached a level of popularity which has never been equaled or even rivaled (no, don’t tell me FateX was more popular, it was not). AOHell allowed people to do several basic things. Firstly, it allowed anyone, his sister, mother and dog, to create fake accounts on AOL using randomly generated information. Secondly, it had a few built in macro’s, the most popular of which was the “scrolling middle finger.” Third, you could “email bomb” or “IM bomb” people, and just be generally disruptive, which was the true intent of Da Chronic. The original version of AOHell was released around November 1994.

So at this time, AOL didn’t really do a whole lot to stop the spread of Warez on their system. I’m sure they regret this now. Had they been aggressive in the early stages of the development of the scene, I am positive that it would not have survived, just as it did not on other similar services, such as Compuserve and Prodigy. All AOL did was modify the account sign up process. Essentially, they changed the checking account creation to have some sort of validation period, and basically that was about it for a while. Of course, that didn’t stop us. Some brilliant person figured out the now infamous ‘5396’ MasterCard prefix. Simply by having the correct 4 digit CC prefix, you could still create fake accounts fairly quickly, and AOHell and similar programs automated the process for you.

The “scene” as an organized community did not establish itself until the middle of 1995, probably during the summer months. Prior to this time, such a thing as “free warez” did not exist. You traded for programs/games/utilities etc. Then along game the first known organized group, dedicated to the “free warez” concept, SHiZZa. Basically, group members from SHiZZa went around warez rooms (now being called such things as ‘cold’ or ‘thin’ ice, since the word “warez” had been banned), and recruited new members. This was taken a step further by FWA (the Free Warez Alliance, which claimed to have created the ‘freewarez’ series of private rooms, once the ‘ice’ series was also banned). Other people quickly followed suit, and created groups of their own, most notably, UPS, MySTiC, and SNT which were formed within weeks or months of SHiZZa. Groups worthy of mention who came about in the second and third waves, include Synapse and iMaGe (which iMaGe was formed via merger of Gen-X and Digital) who then later on merged to form what is now Legion, DGG (which spawned off Arise), WaY (which died off), Logic (which moved to I-Net only), and OsW (died off). I’m sure there were other groups during this time, but these are the most important and prominent ones (and the ones which I can still remember). The three dominant groups during this time were UPS, MySTiC and WaY (the latter of which, I was a part of for a few short weeks). UPSS by the way, (the AOL arm of UPS), was the first group to begin “massmailing” Warez with automated programs, and WaY took it a step further when CooLziE created IcE DroP MM’er, the first stable, fast, and fully automated MM program (it could both collect screen names from a chat room where people signed up, and then MM them all on its own).
It was also during this time when “phishing” for accounts was ever so popular. Stupid new AOL’ers just seemed to love sharing their accounts with people. At that time, it was almost too easy to steal passwords since no one made unique, hard to guess pw’s. I remember trying out passwords like sex123 and getting into accounts with ease. Of course, the other major thing which was going on was “carding.” Once you stole a person’s CC information (or more often, they ‘volunteered’ it, you could go to places such as buy.com and FedEx shit using that stolen CC info, and within a few days have a new computer, or stereo or whatever your heart desired. Now, this is a simplified explanation of how ‘phishing’ and ‘carding’ both worked, but I am not going to get into the details of those two scenes; I merely wanted to mention them because they were loosely associated with the Warez scene.

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